Monday, 21 May 2018

Stress & Oral Health

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about Stress and your Oral Health!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentistry by Design  
Horia T. Ionescu, DDS  
9381 E. Stockton Blvd., Suite 100 
Elk Grove, CA 95624 
(916) 685-4662  
ElkGroveDentistry.com

Wednesday, 16 May 2018

High Blood Pressure Readings? “Why is this important when you’re just working in my mouth?”


Here at Dentistry by Design, we routinely take blood pressure readings for all of our patients,
and are frequently asked, “Why is this important when you’re just working in my mouth?”  We welcome questions, and always appreciate our patients for being understanding of this protocol.  In honor of Blood Pressure Awareness month, we wanted to share the importance of why we have this procedure in place. 


We strive to do our best in taking care of our patients’ oral health and we strongly believe in overall systemic health. However, patients often overlook the fact that the oral health is connected to the systemic health of the individual.


We are fortunate enough to see patients 2-4 times a year, which is more often than their physician. As dental hygienists, we are in a unique position to assess blood pressure and increase our patients' awareness about the risks associated with untreated hypertension due to the sheer number of times we see an individual patient on an annual basis. When we inform an unknowing patient that he or she has undetected, uncontrolled hypertension (high blood pressure), the dental visit then serves as an entry point for the person to take charge of his or her overall health.


High blood pressure is known as a “silent killer”, and many times, by the time the patient reaches their physician, or has any symptoms, their blood pressure is sky high and may have already caused serious damage to the heart, blood vessels, kidneys and eyes, which may result in a stroke, heart attack, or aneurysm. 


High blood pressure readings also alert your dental staff of your risk for a medical emergency; thus, changing the type of local anesthetic we may administer. We may choose to limit the amount of vasoconstrictor or epinephrine, or avoid them completely, and opt to use an anesthetic without any epinephrine or vasoconstrictor.


As for some, a visit to the dentist can be less than enjoyable, and we are aware that a significant percentage of the population does have true dental anxiety. ‘White coat syndrome’ will cause a patient to have high blood pressure due to this anxiety or fear.  Other contributing factors could be, but are not limited to, coming directly from the gym or drinking large amounts of caffeine. This is why we will take blood pressure readings multiple times to obtain the most accurate average


Again, your overall health is our first priority and we appreciate all of you for being accepting, patient, and understanding the benefit of having this protocol in place. 

Navleen Sandhu, RDH, BS

Dentistry by Design  
Horia T. Ionescu, DDS  
9381 E. Stockton Blvd., Suite 100 
Elk Grove, CA 95624 
(916) 685-4662  
ElkGroveDentistry.com

Monday, 14 May 2018

Periodontal Screening

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about Periodontal Screening!


Dentistry by Design  
Horia T. Ionescu, DDS  
9381 E. Stockton Blvd., Suite 100 
Elk Grove, CA 95624 
(916) 685-4662  
ElkGroveDentistry.com

Saturday, 5 May 2018

What 10 Common Mouth Issues Really Look Like (Part 3 of 3)

You know good dental habits can help prevent things like cavities and gingivitis, but you may not know what conditions like these really look like or how they can affect your mouth. Use this visual guide to learn more about some of the most common dental health issues, symptoms to watch for and the potential treatments that are available. Please note: This content is for informational purposes only. Only a dentist, physician or other qualified health care professional can make a diagnosis.

Darkened Tooth







There are two reasons your tooth may change color after trauma: It’s either trying to protect the nerve or it’s dying. If it’s protecting the nerve, your tooth may look a little darker than the ones next to it. If it changes colors like a bruise (from pink to gray), this means your tooth is most likely dead. You may need a root canal, usually followed by a crown. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the tooth. If it is a baby tooth, you may be able to leave it alone until it falls out.

Canker Sores








Canker sores are small white or gray sores with a red border that appear your lips, the back of your throat or under your tongue. Their exact cause is uncertain but some suggest that immune system problems, bacteria or viruses may be play a role. They are also more common in women.


Canker sores aren’t contagious and usually heal on their own after one or two weeks. Over-the-counter creams and mouthwashes may give you temporary relief. Until it heals, stay away from hot, spicy or acidic foods because these can irritate the sore.

Cancer
 







Each year, approximately 40,000 new cases of oral cancer and cancers of the throat, tonsils and back of the tongue are diagnosed. Tobacco use, alcohol abuse and HPV all increase your chance of developing these cancers. Men are twice more likely to get oral cancer than women. During regular checkups, your dentist will check your mouth for symptoms like red or white patches, sores that won’t heal and rough, crusty spots. If anything suspicious is found, your dentist will order more testing or refer you to a specialist. The image above is only one example of how oral cancer might appear.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Dentistry by Design  
Horia T. Ionescu, DDS  
9381 E. Stockton Blvd., Suite 100 
Elk Grove, CA 95624 
(916) 685-4662  
ElkGroveDentistry.com

Saturday, 28 April 2018

What 10 Common Mouth Issues Really Look Like (Part 2 of 3)

You know good dental habits can help prevent things like cavities and gingivitis, but you may not know what conditions like these really look like or how they can affect your mouth. Use this visual guide to learn more about some of the most common dental health issues, symptoms to watch for and the potential treatments that are available. Please note: This content is for informational purposes only. Only a dentist, physician or other qualified health care professional can make a diagnosis.

Gingivitis
 







Gingivitis is the earliest stage of gum disease, an infection of the tissues around your teeth caused by plaque. If you have gingivitis, your gums may become red, swollen and bleed easily. You may also experience bad breath. Because gum disease is usually painless, you may not know you have it.
You are more likely to develop gum disease if you skip brushing and flossing, use tobacco, have crooked teeth that are hard to keep clean, are pregnant, have diabetes or take certain medications. When in its early stages, the disease is still reversible and your gums can be returned to good health with a professional cleaning from your dentist, along with daily brushing and flossing.


Periodontitis








Periodontitis is the more advanced form of gum disease, a major cause of tooth loss in adults. According to the CDC, nearly half of U.S. adults suffer from it. The disease can be reversed in early stages, but damage may be permanent the longer it goes untreated. Although you may not be aware of the gum disease in your mouth, abscesses can develop which usually painful. Symptoms include bleeding, swollen gums, persistent bad breath or bad taste, loose permanent teeth and a change in bite. Your teeth may appear to become longer as gums and bone recede. There are many treatments available, including deep cleanings known as scaling and root planing. Talk to your dentist to find out what’s best for you.

Thrush








Thrush is a yeast infection that looks like white film in your mouth. You’re more likely to get thrush if you have an illness that affects your immune system. This includes people with HIV/AIDS or cancer, as well as people using steroids to manage their asthma. People with untreated or uncontrolled diabetes are also susceptible because sugar in saliva encourages yeast to grow. Thrush is also common in people who wear dentures. If you have symptoms, see your dentist. After a scraping to confirm you have thrush, your dentist can prescribe medicine to clear it up.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Dentistry by Design  
Horia T. Ionescu, DDS  
9381 E. Stockton Blvd., Suite 100 
Elk Grove, CA 95624 
(916) 685-4662  
ElkGroveDentistry.com